Indian-American in DHS’ Faith-Based Security Advisory Council

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New York– Indian-American community leader Chandru Acharya has been appointed to the US Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Faith-Based Security Advisory Council.

Acharya is the lone Hindu voice in this committee of 25 distinguished faith leaders from the US, a media release said.

He is widely acknowledged in the Hindu American community and interfaith forums for building bridges with various faith communities through dialogue and peace initiatives, it added.

Acharya was raised in India and now lives with his wife Smita and their two teenagers in Canton. He is the president of Imetris Corporation, an IT consulting and services company based in Saline, Michigan.

He is also a yoga instructor and football coach. He teaches Hindu history, heritage and culture at Canton’s Hindu Temple Balagokulam and is regularly invited to speak about Hinduism in nearby schools and colleges.

An interfaith activist, he participates in a local Interfaith Community Outreach Group and is a board member of the Interfaith Leadership Council of Detroit and the South Asian American Voices for Impact.

Over the last two decades, he has been actively involved with diverse community organisations that work locally and nationally for social equity and pluralism.

The Faith-Based Security Advisory Council provides advice to the Secretary and other senior leadership on matters related to protecting houses of worship, preparedness and enhanced coordination with the faith community.

“This Council is an important way for the Department to engage formally with critical partners on issues impacting faith communities, said Brenda Abdelall, Assistant Secretary for Partnership and Engagement.

“Members of the Faith-Based Security Advisory Council will provide valuable insight that will benefit our stakeholders nationwide on important issues within the scope of the Department’s mission.” (IANS)

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