Modern education failed to create compassionate humans, says Amjad Ali Khan

Mumbai–Sarod maestro Amjad Ali Khan finds it sad that modern education could not make human beings compassionate and that people are “so greedy”.

Amjad Ali Khan, who was present here on Tuesday for the launch of his book titled “Master on Masters”, told IANS: “I feel sad that our education system could not create compassionate minds among youngsters. What is the use of education if our future generation is not understanding that we are the children of a common God and nobody is superior….

Amjad Ali Khan

“All have the same blood colour – red. What is the modern education contributing to our society if our children are so greedy? This situation saddens me.”

The sarod legend has written the book, published by Penguin Random House India, on 12 iconic musicians like Ghulam Ali Khan, Amir Khan and Alla Rakha. He has shared his bonding with them through narratives and anecdotes.

Reliving those memories was quite an emotional journey for Amjad Ali Khan as his natural expression is music.

“Once I went to Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan sahab’s house with my abbajaan as he invited us for a lunch. He blessed me with a bright future and advised to do riyaaz. Khan sahab asked me ‘Who is your favourite singer in the present time?’ Though that time, my favourite singers were Nazakat Ali and Salamat Ali, I didn’t say so.”

“Instead I asked him what is his suggestion on good singers. I saw blind love and affection for his son in his eyes that very moment… when he said: ‘No one sings better than my Mannu (his son Munawar Ali Khan)’. And he advised me not to leave behind a lot of property for children so that they should learn how to struggle, earn and value everything in life,” said the father of sarod players Amaan and Ayaan.

So does the Padma Vibhushan recipient also think the same way about his sons’ performances?

“No. Be it my sons or students, I don’t think about them that way. They are talented and dedicated, and are receiving a lot of love from across the world. But as I am their mentor, I believe they have a long way to go. They are yet to become complete musicians. Classical music is like an ocean. The process of learning is endless,” said the veteran. (IANS)

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